Sources of error in radiometric dating

The rate of uranium decay must have been at least 250,000 times faster than today’s measured rate! As this article has illustrated, rocks may have inherited parent and daughter isotopes from their sources, or they may have been contaminated when they moved through other rocks to their current locations.

Or inflowing water may have mixed isotopes into the rocks.

These basalts yield ages of up to 1 million years based on the amounts of potassium and argon isotopes in the rocks.

To make matters even worse for the claimed reliability of these radiometric dating methods, these same basalts that flowed from the top of the Canyon yield a samarium-neodymium age of about 916 million years,5 and a uranium-lead age of about 2.6 billion years!Nevertheless, geologists insist the radioactive decay rates have always been constant, because it makes these radioactive clocks “work”!New evidence, however, has recently been discovered that can only be explained by the radioactive decay rates not having been constant in the past.9 For example, the radioactive decay of uranium in tiny crystals in a New Mexico granite ( yields a uranium-lead “age” of 1.5 billion years.So geologists have assumed these radioactive decay rates have been constant for billions of years.However, this is an enormous extrapolation of seven orders of magnitude back through immense spans of unobserved time without any concrete proof that such an extrapolation is credible.

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