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Depending on exactly what period Seinfeld is talking about, he might have been telling the truth: Lonstein turned 18 on May 29, 1993, shortly after the two met.

Still, Seinfeld returned to Stern’s show soon thereafter for what Schneider calls “spin control,” though he was still obfuscating the details of their early relationship.

At George Washington University in Washington, where Lonstein, now 18, enrolled in September, the couple walk arm in arm across campus when Seinfeld pops in for an occasional visit.

On weekend trips to Los Angeles, where he tapes his show, they have eggs and cheesecake with his friends and cast members at Jem’s Famous Deli in Studio City before heading off to spend an afternoon shooting hoops in the park.article, which essentially chronicles the first year of their relationship, continues on with further justifications of the couple’s strange existence from both Seinfeld and Lonstein, as well as unnamed sources “close” to the both of them.

“No more.”And yet, the article mostly focuses on Seinfeld’s quest to justify dating a woman 21 years younger than him. Schneider recounts an interview Seinfeld did with Howard Stern, in which Stern, as he would, jokes about Seinfeld being the sort of boogeyman in a windowless van that parents warn little children about.It appears unclear if Lonstein knew exactly who she was talking to at the time, but after a short conversation, she gave her phone number to the comedian, sparking a relationship that would begin around her high school graduation and end right after her college one.The story of Jerry and Shoshanna is probably best told in a “The Game of Love,” published in March of 1994, which is positioned from the perspective of the world having taught itself to accept their romance.Then, returning to the Stern show a month later for another attempt at spin control, he still seemed a bit defensive. “This is the only girl I ever went out with who was that young. We just went to a restaurant, and that was it.” It’s sort of hard to tell what Seinfeld meant here when he says he “wasn’t dating” Lonstein.Perhaps he was attempting to draw a line between their relationship when Lonstein was 17—not “dating”—and when she turned 18—“dating.” Regardless, their romance bloomed, and the two became tasty tabloid fodder.

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