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Thus, king Pepi II would be taking the role of Râ and Sasenet would take the role of Osiris.

The phrase "doing what one desires" would therefore be overrated and misinterpreted.

Homosexuality in ancient Egypt is a passionately disputed subject within Egyptology: historians and egyptologists alike debate what kind of view the ancient Egyptians' society fostered about homosexuality.

Only a handful of direct hints still survive and many possible indications are only vague and offer plenty of room for speculation.

The chapter in which king Pepi II visits his loyal general officer is subject of passionate discussions.

Especially one certain phrase stays in the centre of investigations: the text says, that "his majesty went into Sasenet's house and did to him what his majesty desired".

It remains unclear, what exact view the ancient Egyptians fostered about homosexuality.

Any document and literature that actually contains sexual orientated stories, never name the nature of the sexual deeds, but instead uses stilted and flowery paraphrases.

He catches Seth's semen with his hands and hides it.

Other scholars disagree and interpret the scenes as an evidence that Nyankh-khnum and Khnum-hotep were twins, even possibly conjoined twins.

No matter what interpretation is correct, the paintings show at the very least that Nyankh-khnum and Khnum-hotep must have been very close to each other in life as in death.

Egyptologists and historians disagree about how to interpret the paintings of Nyankh-khnum and Khnum-hotep.

Some scholars believe that the paintings reflect an example of homosexuality between two married men and prove that the ancient Egyptians accepted same-sex relationships.

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